Brian Viloria-Omar Nino Preview

               Brian Viloria vs. Omar Nino             

(WBO Flyweight Title)
12 Rounds, Pasig City, Philippines, May 12, 2012 (Integrated Sports PPV)
When former U.S. Olympian Brian Viloria squares off against rival Omar Nino this weekend in the Philippines, the question on everyone’s mind will be, “is the third time the charm?” Viloria faces his old nemesis Omar Nino for the third time on Saturday, and he is hoping to come away with his first victory in the trilogy.  In two previous meetings, Viloria was beaten decisively by decision (117-112, 118-110- 117-112) and managed only to secure a draw in the rematch (which was later changed to a no-contest after Nino tested positive for a banned substance after the fight).

Now, more than five years have passed since their last meeting, and Viloria, AKA “The Hawaiian Punch” enters this fight with a 30-3 (17) record, and a #1 world ranking according to boxrec.com at flyweight.  Since fighting to a draw with Nino in November 2006, Viloria has won 11 out of 13 fights, losing a majority decision to Edgar Sosa in 2007, and losing by TKO to 39th ranked Carlos Tamara in 2010.  He has won his last four fights, and in his two most recent outings he decisioned 15th rated Julio Cesar Miranda and stopped #9th rated Giovani Segura. 

For Omar Nino, his record since facing Viloria in 2006, is 6-2-1, and includes wins over 11th rated Sammy Gutierrez and 29th rated Rodel Mayol, and losses to 20th rated Gilberto Keb Bass and 105th rated Juanito Rubillar.  Nino is now 35 years old, and he currently finds himself occupying the 20th spot on boxrec.com’s top 108 pound list.

It should be another thrilling, close encounter between two excellent professionals who have intimate “ring knowledge” of one another, and you will want to tune in to find out whether Brian Viloria can find some retribution the third time around, or whether Omar Nino will once again prove himself to be the better of the two.

Brian Viloria

30-3 (17)

 

Omar Nino

31-4-2 (13)

A

Opposition & Experience

A-

C+

Punch Output

B+

B+

Boxing Ability & Intangibles

B+

B-

Aggression

B+

C-

Power

D

B+

Hand Speed

B+

B

Defense

B

A-

Chin

B+

B

Conditioning

B

C+

Punch Accuracy

B-

The Break Down

In his first fight with Nino, back in August of 2006, Brian Viloria fought tentatively, getting out-punched 778-398 and out-landed 245 to 113.  Nino was more aggressive, he countered well, and he took the fight to Viloria, getting off first and controlling the distance on the inside.  Viloria admittedly fought too hesitant, stating “I fought a stupid fight tonight.  I was waiting for him and I needed to throw my combinations like I was supposed to.  I needed to be a lot more aggressive.”  In their second meeting (three months later), Viloria displayed a much improved disposition and strategy, but still found himself being out-gunned and forced to settle with a majority decision draw (112-115, 113-113, 113-113) when it was all said and done.  This time, Viloria is riding a four fight win streak and he appears to be fighting better now than at any previous point in his career.  I think Viloria comes into this fight as the more experienced fighter (particularly of late), he is the slightly more powerful and durable of the two, and the advantages he ceded to Nino in the past two fights are things that can easily be corrected this time around.  Nino was more aggressive, and more active in their two previous encounters, but I think Viloria is more willing (and capable) of doing what is needed to win this time around.  “I’m really hungry to correct my past mistakes with my (upcoming) win over Nino,” said Viloria.  “I can’t wait; and it’s been my fuel and inspiration in training camp.”

For Nino, it is simply a matter of continuing to do what worked for him in the past.  Some fighters and styles will always match up favorably, and in the case of Nino-Viloria, the former may just have the latter’s number (think Orlando Salido and Juan Manuel Lopez).  I think it will be interesting to see who sets the pace and forces the tempo in this one.  If Viloria fights with a greater sense of urgency and doesn’t throw punches from too far out (as he is sometimes accustomed to doing) than I think he stands a good chance of getting the elusive win.  However, if Nino presses the action, lands accurate shots and outhustles him, we could witness a carbon copy battle (and outcome). 

Conclusion

The outcome of this fight will be affected largely by two factors; the law of averages, and the “inspired” performances of late by Brian Viloria.  In his last two outings Viloria beat two very good fighters, and it would appear that he is entering this fight on a career high.  I also think the powers of redemption, such as they are, create an overwhelming sense of motivation for Viloria to succeed this time around.  Plus, if these two fought ten times I think Viloria would likely win an equal share.  Therefore, with the series now favoring Nino 1-0-1, I think Viloria is in a good position as he travels back to the familiar confines of the Philippines, touting a new belt and a greater sense of confidence.  He is younger, he seems prepared mentally, and he is coming off an exceptional performance in which he not only stopped Giovani Segura, but also dominated him over the course of 7 rounds.

(Viloria by unanimous decision)

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